Foreclosure Help

Foreclosure Help

Foreclosure help is available for homeowners in danger of losing their homes, or homeowners who have already gone through a foreclosure sale.  While saving a home from foreclosure is never a guarantee, foreclosure help may be an option in your case depending upon the circumstances.

Before a Foreclosure 

Foreclosure help for homeowners pre-foreclosure largely consists of attempting to obtain a loan modification or similar means of paying the outstanding loan debt.  Despite the best efforts of homeowners to properly apply for this assistance with their lenders, it is not uncommon for lenders to make a mess out of reviewing loan modification applications, by claiming to “lose” paperwork and deny such applications for absurd reasons.  In such a case, an attorney can provide foreclosure help through a lawsuit against a lender’s repeated refusal to properly review of these applications.

An attorney can similarly help a homeowner defend against foreclosure by determining whether a mortgage lender complied with the requirements for starting a foreclosure sale.  Errors in the notice requirements and pre-foreclosure laws can all be effective defenses against a foreclosure sale.

After a Foreclosure

Foreclosure help is also available after a foreclosure has occurred.  Massachusetts is a “non-judicial foreclosure” state, and a mortgage lender is not required to file a court case to foreclose a home.  A mortgage lender, however, must strictly comply with the applicable laws and mortgage terms to conduct a lawful foreclosure.  The failure to do so can be grounds for defending against a foreclosure sale and getting a home back.

In addition to errors in the foreclosure requirements, a homeowner can also pursue equitable challenges to a foreclosure’s validity.  Such claims are circumstances where the lender complied with the basic foreclosure requirements, but otherwise acted in a manner that justifies the foreclosure being void.

Avoid Foreclosure Defense Scams 

A critical reminder for seeking foreclosure help is to avoid foreclosure scams.  There are many con artists who try and take advantage of struggling homeowners by promising them services that are unrealistic or not otherwise legitimate.  Avoid anyone who promises you a free home, guaranteed loan modification, or something else that seems “too good to be true.”  The Attorney General’s Office provides helpful resources for homeowners who have been victims to these scams.

Speak to An Experienced Foreclosure Defense Attorney 

Needless to say, the importance of speaking to an experienced foreclosure defense attorney cannot be overstated.  Foreclosure help may be available to you, but such assistance generally requires the knowledge of someone familiar with this area of law and the options available for saving  a home.

Overview of Housing Court Expansion

Housing Court Expansion

After years of stalled legislation, housing court expansion has finally occurred in Massachusetts.  The recently passed 2018 budget provides for statewide Housing Court, allowing all towns and cities access to a regional division of the Housing Court.  Previously, a large segment of Massachusetts towns and cities–including Somerville, Medford, and Chelsea–had no access to a Housing Court division.  This Housing Court expansion allows landlords and tenants from any part of the state to have their case heard in Housing Court.

Overview of Housing Court

Massachusetts’s Housing Court can hear cases for matters involving the health, safety, or welfare of the occupants or owners of residential housing.  The most common cases in Housing Court are eviction (“summary process”) matters; the Boston Housing Court reportedly hears over 150 new evictions each week.  Housing Court functions similarly as any other court in Massachusetts, but comes with the benefit of judges, clerks, and staff who are familiar with housing law.

Transfer to Housing Court 

A unique provision of Housing Court is the ability by either party to transfer a case into Housing Court from another court.  If you are a tenant in an eviction case filed in District Court (a popular venue for eviction cases), you have a right to have your case transferred to the appropriate Housing Court division.  With the Housing Court expansion, this option is now available to all of Massachusetts.  A Housing Court transfer is a simple process, requiring the filling out of a simple form with the original court and the appropriate Housing Court division.

Although Housing Court expansion became effective on July 1, 2017 (pursuant to the 2018 budget), this change is not yet reflected on the Housing Court website or in the law itself.   The 2018 budget is clear, however, that Housing Court expansion has already occurred.  Several eviction cases have already been transferred from District Courts in cities that were not previously under Housing Court jurisdiction, and I expect more to do so in the coming months.

 Is Housing Court Right For Your Case?

Housing Court expansion will inevitably lead to tenants and landlords asking whether this court is the place to bring their case.  Like with most legal matters, the answer depends.  While many argue that Housing Court favors tenants at the expense of landlords, this is too much of a stereotype to label for every Housing Court division in Massachusetts.  The decision on whether to pick Housing Court for your case is an important one, which you should make with the assistance of an experienced landlord/tenant attorney.

Challenging a Foreclosure in Massachusetts

Challenging a Foreclosure

A recent decision by the Massachusetts Land Court discusses the importance of properly challenging a foreclosure in Massachusetts, and the ramifications of failing to do so correctly.  This case, Kenney v. Brown, is to the best of my knowledge the first decision to interpret Massachusetts’s foreclosure title clearing law, a 2015 law that puts a deadline upon the right of homeowners to challenge a foreclosure in Massachusetts. 

Overview of the Deadline for Challenging a Foreclosure in Massachusetts

Massachusetts’s foreclosure title clearing law places a deadline for challenging a foreclosure in Massachusetts.  This law requires a homeowner to raise a challenge to a foreclosure within three years after a foreclosure affidavit is recorded in the land records where the property is located (this affidavit is generally recorded several months after the foreclosure sale).

How to Preserve A Foreclosure Challenge 

Under this law, a homeowner must challenge a foreclosure by either filing a lawsuit or raising a defense or counterclaim in a post-foreclosure eviction case.  Simply put,  challenging a foreclosure under this new law requires a homeowner to pursue their claim in court.

In Kenney, the homeowners attempted to preserve their challenge to the foreclosure against their home by filing an affidavit in the land records, and pursuing this challenge in court later on.  This affidavit was filed pursuant to G.L. c. 183, § 5B:

Subject to section 15 of chapter 184, an affidavit made by a person claiming to have personal knowledge of the facts therein stated and containing a certificate by an attorney at law that the facts stated in the affidavit are relevant to the title to certain land and will be of benefit and assistance in clarifying the chain of title may be filed for record and shall be recorded in the registry of deeds where the land or any part thereof lies.

These affidavits, commonly known as “5B affidavits” can be useful for resolving property matters.  I have used them in opposing a foreclosure by entry or recording judicial decisions regarding the validity of a foreclosure.  Here, these homeowners attempted to preserve their foreclosure challenge by filing one of these affidavits, and listing the reasons why they believed their foreclosure was unlawful.  These homeowners, undisputedly, did not file a lawsuit within the deadline of the title clearing law.  The question for the court was whether such an affidavit was a proper means for challenging a foreclosure in Massachusetts under the title clearing law’s deadline.

The court in Kenney v. Brown rejected the homeowner’s use of 5B affidavits for this purpose, by holding that the law requires an actual court case to preserve a foreclosure challenge, which may not be done by merely filing an affidavit.  Failure to do so will prevent a homeowner from being able to pursue such a claim, even if the underlining foreclosure was unlawful.

Critical Advice for Homeowners Who Want to Challenge a Wrongful Foreclosure 

The lesson from this case is an important one: speak to an experienced foreclosure defense attorney if you have a potential challenge to a wrongful foreclosure.   The failure to comply with the laws applicable for such a claim can cost you “your day in court” on these matters.

 

 

 

Notice of Default

Notice of Default

Foreclosures in Massachusetts generally begin through a notice of default.  A homeowner who is behind on their mortgage loan often receives many letters informing them of their owed balance.  A formal notice of default, however, is required under state law and the terms of most mortgage agreements.

What’s In a Notice of Default? 

A notice of default typically contains a number of required disclosures:

  • Information about the holder of the mortgage, terms of the loan, and the outstanding balance of the owed debt
  • The amount the borrower must pay to cure the loan default
  • Disclosure of the homeowner’s rights in a foreclosure proceeding

A notice of default must generally be sent by both certified and regular mail.  A homeowner who receives a notice of default will not immediately face a foreclosure sale; there are several other requirements that must occur before a foreclosure can begin.  One of these notices, however, is a sign that the mortgage lender will start foreclosure soon.

What To Do About a Notice of Default

The most important thing for a homeowner receiving a notice of default is to not ignore it.  A foreclosure is coming, and a delay in addressing this problem can make a resolution harder to come by.  Speak to a foreclosure defense attorney if you receive one of these notices to learn what can be done to avoid losing your home.

A homeowner receiving a notice of default should also review these letters closely.  Mistakes can (and do) happen and it is a good idea to make sure everything in one of these notices is correct.

Failure to comply with the requirements for a notice of default can be grounds for challenging a foreclosure, both pre-foreclosure and post-foreclosure.  An experienced attorney can discuss whether such a legal challenge is an option for your case.

A homeowner receiving a notice of default can certainly solve the problem of foreclosure by paying off the outstanding amount of the loan (and should do so if they are able).  Homeowners, however, should keep in mind that simply paying off the outstanding amount of the loan will not solve the long term problem for the borrower if they are unable to afford the monthly loan payments.  In such a case, the homeowner should apply for a loan modification and attempt to get a more affordable loan payment.

If you find yourself in need of assistance with one of these matters, contact me for a consultation.

 

Foreclosure Help

Foreclosure Help

Foreclosure help can be essential for homeowners attempting to avoid foreclosure and save their homes.  One of the biggest mistakes homeowners make is waiting too long to get assistance with this stressful process.  When should homeowners seek foreclosure help?

Preparing a Loan Modification Application 

Foreclosure defense is not about getting a free home; foreclosure defense is about getting an affordable loan payment.  A loan modification is the general way to obtain this relief from a mortgage lender.  Applying for a loan modification, however, can be a complex process, requiring enormous paperwork and follow-up phone calls with the loan servicer.

A homeowner does not need a lawyer or other professional to help with this process.  However, if a homeowner does it on their own, they need to keep up with the paperwork requirements and do the application correctly.  If the homeowner does not have the time or interest in preparing an application, they should absolutely get the help of a reputable professional for this process.  The Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office is one good resource for seeking such assistance, and there are other non-profit organizations around the state who similarly help with loan modification applications.

Problems With The Review of a Loan Modification Application

If a homeowner is having trouble with a loan modification application, foreclosure help is a must.  Often, a lender’s repeated failure to properly review one of these applications, by “losing” paperwork and coming up with bogus reasons for denial, can be grounds for legal action.

Imminent Foreclosure Sale Date

A homeowner with a imminent foreclosure sale date should likewise obtain foreclosure help, mainly through an attorney.  An attorney can help a homeowner understand options available for stopping a foreclosure and see if a permanent resolution to the problem can be reached.

After a Foreclosure Sale

In my opinion, foreclosure help is an absolute must for any homeowner who has already been foreclosed.  A foreclosure defense attorney can help a former homeowner determine if there are grounds to rescind or buy back the foreclosed property.  Even if the homeowner has no interest in staying in the home, an attorney can be incredibly helpful in ensuring that the homeowner’s rights are protected, and avoiding an additional liability.

If you find yourself in need of foreclosure help, contact me for a consultation.

Appealing an Eviction Case

Appealing an eviction case is a complicated subject.  I could write for hours on the topic, and even then, would only cover the basics.  Here, I want to offer two critical points for anyone appealing an eviction case: act quickly, and hire an attorney for your appeal.

What is an Appeal?  What Court Does it Go to?

An appeal is a request for a higher court to review A trial court’s decision (the court where the eviction case was first brought).  An appeal looks at whether the trial court judge made the right decisions in the case, and whether the matter should be sent back to the trial court (“remanded”) for another hearing or trial.

An appeal, importantly, is not a “do over.”  A party generally does not get to do their case all over again, in hopes that the appeals court will come out a different way.  Rather, the appeals court looks at whether the trial court made any errors of law.  This is an important things to keep in mind: even if you believe, strongly, that the trial court got its decision wrong, this may not be enough to win on appeal.

Appeals for eviction cases, whether they be for standard landlord/tenant cases or post-foreclosure eviction matters, are brought in one of two courts.  For eviction cases brought in the District Court, appeals go to the District Court Appellate Division.  This is a court made up of other District Court judges, and hold hearings in different courthouses around the state.  A decision from the Appellate Division can then be appealed to the Appeals Court.  Eviction cases coming from the Housing Court or Superior Court go directly to the Appeals Court, which sits in Boston.

The appeal rules for the Appellate Division and Appeals Court have some differences, but the process is generally the same.  An appeal requires a party to prepare a brief, a written document (usually 40-50 pages) stating the reasons why the lower court was wrong.  Depending on the case, the parties may have an opportunity to do an oral argument before the appellate judges, and state the reasons why the lower court was wrong.  The appellate court will then issue a written decision, where the court will either agree or disagree with the lower court’s decision, and state what will happen next for the case (if anything).

Anyone considering appealing an eviction case should follow the following pieces of advise closely.

Tip #1: Act Quickly 

Hands down, the most important advice on the topic of appeals: act quickly.  Unlike most other appeals, which allow a party thirty days to file a notice of appeal, a notice of appeal for an eviction case must be filed within ten days of the trial court’s entry of judgment.  Moreover, several cases have held that the failure to comply with this deadline is grounds for dismissing an appeal . . . regardless of the circumstances.  This suggests that even a showing of good cause is not enough to file a late notice of appeal for an eviction case.  With this in mind, never, never take a chance of missing this deadline.  If you do not have a lawyer, the clerk’s office can generally help you fill out a notice of appeal, a short form telling the court and other side that you plan to appeal.

This advice, importantly, applies equally to both landlords and tenants/former homeowners: the failure to comply with this appeal deadline can be fatal to your case.

Tip #2: Get a Lawyer

The second piece of advice for appealing an eviction case is to get an attorney.  I’m generally not a fan of advising people with legal matters to do cases on their own.  Without a solid legal background, it is difficult for even the smartest pro se  party to prevail in court.  For appeals, it is near impossible.  The rules of appellate procedure are a challenge for even experienced lawyers, and the many other complexities of appeals make this process a real challenge for even the best lawyers.  If you find yourself involved in appealing an eviction case, don’t do it on your own.  Speak to an experienced attorney about obtaining legal representation.

Sherwin Law Firm Succeeds in Bringing Lawsuit Over a Denial of a Loan Modification

I’m pleased to announced that I prevailed today in bringing a lawsuit against a national lender for the denial of a loan modification.  The court rejected the lender’s argument that the lawsuit should be dismissed, allowing the lawsuit to go forward as planned.  In this lawsuit, I am seeking damages against a lender whose two year refusal to properly review my client’s loan modification application forced him into foreclosure.

What is a Loan Modification?

A loan modification is the restructuring of a mortgage loan to make the payments more affordable.  This generally consists of a combination of a lowered interest rate, term extension, and principle forbearance.  To apply for a loan modification, a borrower must generally prove they have sufficient income to afford a modified loan payment.  Lenders generally want borrowers to provide bank account statements, tax returns, and a variety of other documents about the need for this assistance.

Problems in Applying for Loan Modifications

Despite loan modifications being intended to help homeowners, the process of applying for this assistance is often a mess.  It is not uncommon for lenders to “lose” paperwork and required the repeated submission of the same documents over and over again.  Mortgage lenders have been known to deny loan modifications for reasons that do not make the slightest bit of sense.

What Can Be Done After a Denial of a Loan Modification?

In Massachusetts, like most of the country, a lender is not required to offer a homeowner a loan modification.  As such, a homeowner generally does not have a viable claim against a lender merely because their modification application has been denied.

Massachusetts courts, however, do allow lawsuits to be brought under the Consumer Protection Law under certain circumstances involving the denial of a loan modification.  The Consumer Protection Law, commonly known as Chapter 93A, prohibits “unfair and deceptive business practices.”  Massachusetts courts have taken the positions that repeated instances of misconduct by a lender in the denial of a loan modification can constitute a Consumer Protection Law claim.  This is the key, however: the borrower must alleged more than simply that their application was denied.  Rather, the borrower must show, as one court puts it, a “pattern or course of conduct involving misrepresentations, delay, and evasiveness” in reviewing a loan modification application.

The Consumer Protection Law can be a powerful weapon for consumers facing the denial of a loan modification.  This law, in certain circumstances, can allow for attorney fees, treble damages, and costs if the court find in the borrower’s favor.  In addition to money, the law also provides for equitable relief, which is a remedy other than money, such as a court order rescinding a foreclosure sale.

If your find yourself struggling with the denial of a loan modification, contact me to see if you have a similarly viable lawsuit against your lender.

What Happens After a Foreclosure Sale?

Homeowners who have gone through a foreclosure often ask me what happens after a foreclosure sale.  More specifically, these homeowners often ask if they need to leave their home right away after a foreclosure auction sale.  The answer is no.  Even after a foreclosure sale, the new owner is required to perform an eviction of the occupants remaining in the foreclosed property.

Overview of a Massachusetts Foreclosure

Massachusetts is a non-judicial foreclosure state.  This means that a bank does not need to go to court to get permission to foreclose (unlike states like New York and Florida).  A Massachusetts foreclosure requires sending a number of required notices, publishing a foreclosure sale notice, and holding a foreclosure auction.  If done correctly, the bank (or third-party buyer) becomes the record owner of the property.  While ownership of the home changes after a foreclosure sale, possession does not.  The new record owner is required to bring an eviction case against the former homeowner(s) residing in the foreclosed home.

Post-Foreclosure Eviction

What happens after a foreclosure sale?  The bank (or third-party buyer) must file an eviction against any persons who remain in the property.  This eviction, known as a summary process action, is generally filed in a District Court or Housing Court.  In these cases, the homeowner has the opportunity to defend against the new owner’s claim to possession by alleging that the foreclosure was not performed correctly.

An important point to note for homeowners in such a case: you do not need to leave the home until the court orders you to do so.  The new owner must obtain a judgment from the court allowing them possession of the home.  Until this is done, the new owner cannot forced you out of the property under any circumstances.

What Should You Do After a Foreclosure Sale?

If you have gone through a foreclosure of your home, contact a foreclosure defense attorney for a consultation, regardless of your intentions for the home.  In other words, even if you plan to leave the home, it is still worth speaking to an attorney.  An attorney can help determine if you have a defense against the foreclosure.  Even if you plan to leave the home, a foreclosure defense attorney can assist you with resolving any liability you may have against the new owner and possibly get you relocation assistance.

Avoid Foreclosure

Potential clients often ask me for advice on how to avoid foreclosure.  Here are a few important tips I recommend.

Obtain and Document Income

Contrary to free “advice” available on some Internet websites, foreclosure defense is not about getting a free home.  While there are ways of delaying or stalling foreclosure, that is only what can be done: delay the inevitable.  The only sure means to avoid foreclosure is paying the mortgage loan for the property.  To do so, a homeowner needs income.  For purposes of obtaining a loan modification, a lender will generally consider any documented source of income.  This is an important qualification for showing a lender that you qualify for a modification: you must be able to account for where the money comes from.   This advice is usually most relevant to self-employment and rental income.  Lenders generally want to see such income deposited in a bank account.  Without such deposits, a homeowner faces a difficult time trying to prove they really earned the alleged source of income.

An important side note: homeowners facing foreclosure who do not have the required income to obtain a loan modification should still contact an attorney for assistance with their case.  An attorney can help a homeowner review their options and decide with them their best course of action.

Keep a Record Of All Contact With Your Lender

One of the single, most important pieces of advice I can give homeowners to avoid foreclosure is to keep a record of all contact with your lender.  If you find yourself in a situation where legal action may be necessary, having a record is a huge help in advancing your case.  Even homeowners with the best memories are often unable to remember specific details occurring years ago.  Keeping a paper trail of your communications with a mortgage lender can be one of the best things you do to avoid foreclosure.

Seek The Help of a Foreclosure Defense Lawyer Sooner Than Later

Most importantly, seek the help of a foreclosure defense lawyer sooner than later if you find yourself facing foreclosure.  Stopping a foreclosure becomes increasingly difficult as a foreclosure date is scheduled (but still not impossible; homeowners in any stage of the foreclosure process should talk to a attorney if foreclosure defense is needed).  The sooner you speak to an attorney, the better luck an attorney will have in helping you resolve the problem.

If you need help to avoid foreclosure, contact me for a consultation.

SJC Extends Paragraph 22 Defense

The Supreme Judicial Court issued an important ruling last weekend extending the “paragraph 22 defense” to other homeowners facing foreclosure.  In Federal National Mortgage Association v. Marroquin, the Court extended the benefit of the prior Pinti v. Emigrant Mortgage decision to those homeowners who similarly challenged a foreclosure based on non-compliance with paragraph 22 of the standard mortgage (a full copy of the decision is included below).  This is alot of information to take in at once, so read on for a “non-lawyer” explanation!

Paragraph 22 of the standard mortgage is a provision in a typical mortgage agreement that requires a foreclosing entity to provide a default notice to borrowers prior to foreclosure.  This notice requires specific disclosures that need to be given to the borrower.  In the wake of the recent foreclosure crisis, many of these notices have had errors, and have not included all of the required disclosures.  A paragraph 22 defense is a challenge to a foreclosure based on non-compliance with this mortgage requirement.

In Pinti v. Emigrant Mortgage, the Supreme Judicial Court determined that the failure to strictly comply with this mortgage requirement made the foreclosure void.  Pinti, importantly, required “strict compliance” for this part of the mortgage: a borrower does not need to show any harm from such a defect to challenge the foreclosure.  The Court’s decision in Pinti was “prospective”: it would only apply to the homeowners in Pinti and future foreclosure challenges based on non-compliance with paragraph 22.  In Aurora Loan Services v. Murphy, the Appeals Court extended the Pinti ruling to other cases on appeal at the time of the Pinti decision.

In Federal National Mortgage Association v. Marroquin, the Supreme Judicial Court needed to decide whether a paragraph 22 defense could be raised by a homeowner who had a trial court case pending at the time of Pinti.  This would include post-foreclosure eviction cases and Superior and Land Court challenges to foreclosure.  In  Marroquin, the Supreme Judicial Court extended Pinti to these cases as well.  If a homeowner had raised a paragraph 22 defense in one of these cases at the time of Pinti, “strict compliance” would apply.

Marroquin will likely apply to only a small range of cases.  The Supreme Judicial Court did not suggest that the prospective ruling of Pinti has changed.  In other words, a homeowner who did not properly preserve a paragraph 22 defense will not be helped by Marroquin.  As this decision comes over 1.5 years after Pinti, there are likely many homeowners who had such viable defenses, but failed to preserve them, on the belief that Pinti’s  prospective ruling would not let this defense apply to their case.

This is my main complaint with Marroquin and the Supreme Judicial Court’s other decisions on paragraph 22.  The Court in Pinti knew that the issue of the paragraph 22 defense would come before the Court again.  Why the Court could not have addressed this matter in the first place, making these later decisions unnecessary, is beyond me.  Nonetheless,  Marroquin fully resolves the scope of this defense for homeowners with a paragraph 22 defect.

If you find yourself in need of assistance with foreclosure, contact me for a consultation.

Federal National Mortgage Association v. Marroquin