Massachusetts Zoning: What You Need to Know

A recent article about Medford, concerning the challenges of getting past the city’s land use controls, is a good example of the importance of understanding Massachusetts zoning when seeking to develop property.  The article discusses many of the hurdles that can arise when attempting to seek zoning approval from a local municipality.

Overview of Massachusetts Zoning

Zoning are rules and regulations controlling how one uses their property.  The purpose of zoning is to keep order and consistency within municipalities.  Visit a city without zoning controls and you’ll see the reason why such regulations are in place.

Zoning ordinances generally consist of dimensional and use controls for real property.  As discussed in this article, these ordinances are often complex and highly detailed.

Exemptions from Massachusetts Zoning 

Massachusetts zoning often becomes an issue when a property owner is unable to comply with a zoning ordinance.  In such a case, a variance is required.  A variance requires a finding that:

[O]wing to circumstances relating to the soil conditions, shape, or topography of such land or structures and especially affecting such land or structures but not affecting generally the zoning district in which it is located, a literal enforcement of the provisions of the ordinance or by-law would involve substantial hardship, financial or otherwise, to the petitioner or appellant, and that desirable relief may be granted without substantial detriment to the public good and without nullifying or substantially derogating from the intent or purpose of such ordinance or by-law.

Additionally, some uses under a town or city’s zoning ordinance require specific approval by a local zoning permitting authority, known as a special permit.  The requirements for a special permit are not as rigorous as a variance, but a special permit must still be approved by the appropriate town or city board (often the zoning board of appeals or planning board).

In addition to zoning, there are often other regulations concerning real estate development, including environmental, historic preservation, and affordable housing requirements.

Conclusion

Massachusetts zoning requirements can be confusing.  For assistance with this process, consider speaking with an experienced real estate litigation attorney, who can assist with this process.