5 Things to Know About Massachusetts Land Court

Massachusetts has a unique forum for handling real estate disputes: Land Court. Land Court is a specialty court which handles a wide array of property issues, including Servicemembers’ Cases, boundary disputes, and other real property matters. Those involved with a real estate issue should be familiar with this court’s unique features.

1. No Jury Trials

No jury trials are allowed in Land Court. If you file a case in this court, your matter gets decided solely by a judge. This, in my opinion, is a great feature of Land Court for certain cases, such as adverse possession, which are best suited for a judge to decide, and not a jury.

Another feature of Land Court are judges with expertise in Massachusetts property law. It is a safe bet that the judge you are appearing before has heard a case of this type before, and has a solid background on the applicable law.

2. Assigned Judges for Cases

In most Massachusetts state courts, judges sit in different sessions at different periods of time. It is not uncommon in Superior Court, for example, to have a case heard by multiple judges for the duration of the lawsuit.

In Land Court, a single judge is assigned to each case. A benefit of this is that the judge will have familiarity with the history of the case throughout the proceedings. This is a huge benefit for complex and detailed matters.

3. Early Case Management Conferences

Upon the filing of a case, the court schedules a case management conference. This is an opportunity to meet with the judge and opposing party and make a plan for the case. Many times, this initial hearing can help pave the way forward to resolving the dispute.

4. Servicemembers’ Cases

Servicemembers’ cases are typically brought in Land Court. These cases are to determine whether a party is in the active military service, which provides some protections against foreclosure and other legal proceedings.

Such proceedings are often confused with an actual foreclosure sale itself. These cases, however, are only a prerequisite to a foreclosure sale. Unless the homeowner is in the active military service, the homeowner generally does not have a defense to one of these matters. Nonetheless, a homeowner who receives one of these notices should be proactive about addressing the oncoming foreclosure against their home.

5. Jurisdiction Over Registered Land

Land Court has exclusive jurisdiction over registered land. Registered land is a unique form of public land record keeping that is certified by the state. Land records for registered land are generally organized by certificates of title on the public land registries.

Land Court certifies such land records, and authorizes whether changes may be allowed to the property’s title. If your case involves registered land, more often than not, a Land Court proceeding will be necessary.

Conclusion

If you need assistance with a real estate matter, contact me for a consultation.

Forced Sale of a Home – Understanding Massachusetts Partition Cases

Real estate is commonly owned by multiple persons.  It is not unusual for married couples, family members, and even friends to own real estate together, and share in the responsibilities and upkeep of the property.  When everyone is fine with owning the home together, no problems exist.  It becomes more difficult when one or more owners of the property wants out.  When this happens, a property owner can begin a court action for a forced sale of a home, known as partition.  While this post is aimed at multiple owners of a residential home, the same type of relief is available for all types of jointly owned real estate.

What is Partition?

Partition is a court case to divide jointly owned property.  A partition case may be heard in Land Court (most common) or Probate and Family Court.  Partition, importantly, is an absolute right of any property owner: if one owner wants to do a forced sale of a home, they can do so.

The Court will first determine the best way to divide the property, either through partition in kind or partition by sale.  A partition in kind is the physical division of property.  If the court can simply “split the baby” and give each owner a share of the property, this is the preferred outcome.  Most of the time, particularly with single residential homes, this is not a realistic possibility.  The other, and more common, form of partition is a partition by sale: the court orders that the home is sold, and proceeds divided among the owners.

Who Gets What?

A central job of the court in a forced sale of a home is determining who gets what.  A court will not merely allocate the proceeds from a home sale simply based on each party’s ownership of the property.  The court will consider whether one party contributed a greater share towards the initial purchase of the home and whether one owner made permanent improvements to the property.  The court will also consider whether one party was responsible for paying the property taxes, insurance, and other expenses responsible with property ownership.

How to Succeed With a Forced Sale of a Home

The best way to succeed with the forced sale of a home is to try and prevent one of these cases from happening in the first place.  A partition case often results in the owners getting much less than they would if they simply agreed to sell it on their own.  Joint property owners can negotiate to “buy out” the other owner’s share of the home, or simply agree on a sale price for the property.  An experienced attorney can help you determine if this is a possibility or, alternatively, help you succeed in a partition case.