Fixing a Foreclosure Problem in Massachusetts

Challenging a Foreclosure

Fixing a foreclosure problem is a matter that may be necessary if a mistake is made in the foreclosure process. If such a mistake occurs, and the foreclosure is void, the buyer does not have full ownership of the property, which will prevent them from evicting any of the occupants or selling the home at a later date.

Fortunately, there are options available for fixing a foreclosure. As someone who has both helped buyers of foreclosed properties with these matters, and homeowners attempting to avoid foreclosure, I know many of the common pitfalls in this area of law.

Overview of Foreclosure In Massachusetts

Massachusetts is a non-judicial foreclosure state. This means that, unlike many other states (such as New York and Vermont), a lender does not need to go to court to foreclose. Rather, a lender can foreclose through a series of legal notices and a public auction sale.

The requirements for a foreclosure in Massachusetts are detailed and must be strictly complied with. Even a minor, innocent mistake can be grounds for arguing that a foreclosure is void.

Common Errors In Massachusetts Foreclosures

Common errors in Massachusetts foreclosures include, but are not limited to, the following:

For a third-party buyer of a foreclosed property, these defects can be problematic. Even though the lender made the error, such defenses can be used against the subsequent buyer of the foreclosed property, to challenge the home’s ownership.

Fixing a Foreclosure: What Can Be Done?

The first step for attempting to resolve a foreclosure problem is to try and negotiate with the former homeowner, if possible. If the former homeowner no longer lives in the home, or has no interest in keeping the property, it may be possible to reach an agreement where ownership of the home can be resolved.

If this is not possible, a court action will likely be necessary. In such a case, a third-party buyer can ask a court to quiet title for the property or allow it to perform a new foreclosure sale.

Final Thoughts

Addressing an issue with a foreclosure should never be done without an experienced attorney’s help. If you need assistance with such a matter, contact me for a consultation.

Quiet Title in Massachusetts

Quiet title is a legal action used to resolved real estate disputes. This action asks a court to issue an order resolving a property issue. This can be highly effective in determining one’s rights in property.

Overview of Quiet Title

Quiet title is a broad cause of action, and can conceivably be used for any type of real estate dispute where the rights of property are at issue.

I like to think of quiet title as being a declaratory judgment action for property, where a court is being asked to resolve an actual controversy.

Quiet title, importantly, gives a claimant a lot of leeway in who an action can be brought against, including “the claims or rights of persons unascertained, not in being, unknown or out of the commonwealth.” This is helpful for disputes where the potential defendants are unknown or not entirely certain.

Where to File

Quiet title actions are most often filed in Superior Court and Land Court. Deciding which court to use is a critical decision, which an experienced attorney can help with.

In my experience, Land Court is often the best forum for these matters. Land Court judges have a solid background in real estate matters, and expertise in addressing such cases in a prompt and effective manner.

Other Options for Resolving Property Disputes

When bringing a lawsuit to resolve a property dispute, it is important to similarly consider and include any other causes of action for resolving property disputes.

For boundary disputes, claims of adverse possession and easement by prescription often arise and come into play. Try title, which forces an opposing party to raise all of their claims to a property in a single action, is also a claim that should be considered in such matters.

Property disputes involving deeds and mortgages often implicate matters concerning reformations and discharges.

Final Thoughts

If you need assistance with a real estate dispute, contact me for a consultation.