Understanding a Real Estate Purchase Agreement

A real estate purchase agreement is an essential part of buying or selling property.  Understanding the importance of these agreements is essential for avoiding potential problems later on in the sale process.

Selling Property Generally Requires A Written Agreement 

Massachusetts, like most states, has a statue of frauds, a law requiring that certain types of agreements be in writing to be enforceable, including the sale of property.  With few, limited exceptions, an oral agreement will not suffice when real estate is involved.

Importantly, the type of writing allowed for such agreements is broader than a traditional written contract.  A recent Land Court decision found that a binding agreement for the sale of property was created through text messages, and similar decisions have held that emails are also sufficient for satisfying the statute of frauds.

Common Types of Real Estate Purchase Agreements

For the sale of residential property, there are two common types of real estate purchase agreements: an offer to purchase real estate and a purchase and sale agreement.

An offer to purchase real estate is just that: a written offer for the sale of property.  These agreements are generally one or two pages and contain the “bare bones” terms of the sale.

When the parties are ready to move forward with the sale, a purchase and sale agreement is generally negotiated and signed.  This agreement contains more information on the sale of the property, which generally comes after the parties have had more time to seek financing and discuss the specific details of the sale.

The most important thing to remember about real estate purchase agreements is that such agreements are generally binding contracts.  If signed, a party is generally committed to selling or buying the property.  There can be defenses to such agreements, but a seller or buyer should exercise extreme care in signing one of these agreements.

Drafting Real Estate Purchase Agreements

If you are involved in buying or selling real estate, hire a lawyer to assist you in drafting a real estate purchase agreement.  An experienced attorney will know what to include in these agreements and how to include contingency clauses that excuse a party from performance if they are not able to buy or sell the property.

Enforcing or Defending a Real Estate Purchase Agreement 

If you need to enforce or defend a real estate purchase agreement, you need an experienced real estate litigation attorney on your side.  An attorney will help you in determining the right cause of action for your case and know the ways that the legal system can protect your interest in the property while the legal case is ongoing.

If you need help with one of these cases, contact me for a consultation.

Legal Tips for Buying Your First Home

Buying your first home can  be both an exciting and stressful experience.  While home ownership is, to many, the height of financial success, the process of purchasing a home has many traps for the unwary.

As a lawyer involved in real estate litigation, my cases generally come to me when things go wrong.  Here, I want to share some legal tips for buying your first home that can help avoid these pitfalls and make the experience as easy as possible.

Review Your Finances With a Financial Expert Prior to Purchasing a Home

A large portion of my practice consists of foreclosure defense.  While I have helped many, many homeowners save their homes from foreclosure, I always maintain that the best way to beat foreclosure is to avoid it in the first place.  With this in mind, a potential home buyer should always speak with a financial expert prior to making an offer on a home.  An expert can help you identify a home that meets your budget and offer advice for covering the many expenses that come with home ownership.  Buying your first home is an enormous financial investment, one that a financial expert can be a great help with.

Get Everything in Writing

Enforcing any oral promise is tough to do, for the simple reason that it is tough to prove one’s word against someone else’s.  In real estate, oral promises are even more problematic due to the statute of frauds, a legal requirement that most contracts for real estate be in writing.  Without such a writing, it can be difficult (and many times, impossible) to enforce an oral promise.  Make sure that all matters concerning the purchase of your  first home are in writing.

Give Careful Consideration to the Demands of Becoming a Landlord

When looking to purchase a home, many potential buyers are tempted to purchase homes that include a rental unit, to offset the expenses of home ownership.  Rental property can be an excellent investment, but you need to give careful consideration to the demands of becoming a landlord prior to purchasing such property.

Massachusetts has many, many requirements for landlords, and the penalties for not following these laws can be disastrous.  Moreover, as a landlord, you’ll be responsible for maintaining the property and addressing the problems that will come up over time.  Be prepared for these responsibilities before making this commitment.

Be Wary of Buying a Home With a Non-Married Partner

For a married couple, the process of addressing “who gets the home” during a divorce is difficult enough on its own.  For home owners who are not married, the process can be even more complicated.  If the non-married home owners split up, and are unable to agree on what to do with the home, a partition case may become necessary: a legal proceeding where the court determines who gets what, which can be long and expensive.

With this in mind, be careful about making the commitment of purchasing a home with someone who is not your “permanent” significant other.  If the relationship goes south, the process of dealing with the home can be a real hassle to resolve.

Hire a Lawyer for the Real Estate Closing

When closing on a home, hire a lawyer.  Buying your first home can be a complicated process, and having an experienced attorney on your side can make the process much easier.  It may be tempting to try and do this on your own, but resist this temptation!  A real estate attorney will review the necessary paperwork for your purchase and ensure that nothing is missing or incorrect.  The small fee for this legal service will go a long way in avoiding problems down the road.

Conclusion

Here’s hoping the purchase of your first home is a stress free and rewarding experience.  In the event that a legal problem does arise, contact me for a consultation.  The benefits of having an experienced attorney on your side can make all the difference in getting you the help you need.

5B Affidavits

Massachusetts has an important law allowing for the clarification of potential issues in the ownership of property.  G.L. 183, § 5B provides for the following:

Subject to section 15 of chapter 184, an affidavit made by a person claiming to have personal knowledge of the facts therein stated and containing a certificate by an attorney at law that the facts stated in the affidavit are relevant to the title to certain land and will be of benefit and assistance in clarifying the chain of title may be filed for record and shall be recorded in the registry of deeds where the land or any part thereof lies.

Commonly known as “5B Affidavits”, these affidavits allow for the recording of information relevant to real property.  5B affidavits can be used to correct problems arising with Massachusetts real estate, such as potential problems involving the conveyance of property.  I have found 5B affidavits to be useful for foreclosure related matters; a foreclosure by entry, which is a foreclosure that begins with the recording of a certificate in the land records, requires a homeowner to oppose this foreclosure within three years of this certificate’s filing in the land records.  A 5B affidavit can be used as a means of preventing this type of foreclosure from occurring.

5B affidavits, importantly, must be certified by an attorney.  The law does not allow a non-attorney to record one of these affidavits on their own.

While 5B affidavits are commonly used for real estate matters, there is surprisingly little caselaw on the limits to how these affidavits can be used.  Although the law is written broadly, for use in “clarifying the chain of title” for real estate, I take the position that an attorney should exercise caution in recording such an affidavit.  A 5B affidavit should have a good faith basis in law and fact, and have a real purpose for the respective property it pertains to.  An affidavit that does not meet this standard can potentially subject a property owner (and attorney) to potential liability.

If you find yourself in a real estate dispute, contact me for a consultation.

Real Estate Contract Disputes

Real Estate Contract Disputes

Real estate contract disputes can arise over the selling and purchase of property.  Given that transfers in real estate have much at stake, these disputes can often become contentious and require the assistance of an experienced property attorney.

Avoiding Real Estate Disputes in the First Place 

Avoiding a potential problem in the first place in a real estate contract should always be a central consideration in entering into such an agreement.  If you are considering selling or purchasing property, you should always seek the assistance of an experienced attorney in preparing such an agreement.  An attorney can often help identify potential problems that might arise later on, and offer advice to protect yourself if a dispute develops.

Ways to Protect Real Estate When a Dispute Arises

A primary, immediate concern for real estate contract disputes is protecting the underlining property.  For example, if you entered into a contract to purchase property, and the seller intends to sell the property to someone else, your immediate goal is to do something to stop the sale.  Similarly, if the subject property is being damaged or neglected, you would want something done immediately to cure the problem.  Fortunately, the law offers some safeguards when these problems arise.

One common device used in real estate contract disputes is a lis pendens.  A lis pendens is a notice of a lawsuit involving an interest in real property, which is recorded in the land records.  This is a simple notice stating the name and case number of the underlining lawsuit, which must be endorsed by the  court.  A lis pendens is effective in real estate contract disputes because, as a public document, it puts any potential buyers of the property on notice about the underlining lawsuit.  Few buyers would be willing to purchase real estate if the property is subject to ongoing legal action.

Another effective tool for protecting real estate is an injunction.  An injunction is a court order restraining or compelling a party to do a particular act.  A court, for example, could issue an injunction stopping a party from damaging property is there is reason to believe such damage is occurring.  An essential requirement of an injunction is irreparable harm.   A court will not issue an injunction is money is the only thing that may be lost; a court will need to be convinced that a loss will occur that money alone cannot solve.

What Can You Get in a Real Estate Contract Dispute?

Contract disputes are generally about money, and determining the proper amount to give to someone for damages.  However, for contract disputes where money alone will not help an injured party, the law provides for the remedy of specific performance.  Specific performance allows a party to get exactly what they contracted for, and is generally allowed when this relief involves something distinctly unique.

Specific performance is usually allowed for real estate contract cases.  The rationale is that a particular property cannot be “replaced” by another, and a damaged party is entitled to the exact real estate they contracted for.  For real estate contract disputes, this is often the preferred outcome by parties in these cases.

If you find yourself involved in such a matter, contact me for a consultation.

Sherwin Law Firm Succeeds in Rescission of Contract Case

I’m pleased to announce that I prevailed last month in a rescission of contract case in Essex Superior Court.  The case involved many important issues involving real estate contracts and the relief that a party to such a contract can obtain from a court if the agreement runs into problems.

Overview of Case

This case involved an oral agreement between two parties for the purchase of a residential home.  The deal involved the payment of cash and a promise by one of the parties to assume the mortgage loan.  This required the buyer to apply for the mortgage loan to be put in his name, so that the seller was no longer responsible for the debt.  This deal was done by a “handshake”-the parties never put the terms of the agreement in writing.

Several years after this deal was made, the seller believed that the buyer had not fulfilled the terms of the deal, and brought a lawsuit seeking a rescission of the contract.  A rescission of contract is an action seeking to “undo” a contract.  This asks the court to unmake the agreement and put the parties back in the position they were in before the deal was made.

What is a Rescission of Contract?

A rescission of contract is not readily allowed by courts; only certain circumstances will justify this relief.  Rescission is generally only allowed in cases of fraud or when a party has committed a material breach of contract: one that defeats its purpose.  Here, the seller in this case was alleging this latter reason for seeking a rescission of contract, by arguing that the buyer (my client) failed to comply with important terms of the deal.

Outcome of Case

My strategy in this case was to convince the court that my client had done what was required of him per this agreement.  Because this was an oral agreement, this required me to attack the other side’s credibility and build a case that the seller’s story was not believable.  In the end, the Court agreed with my client, finding that he had done his end of the deal.

Such a case required an enormous amount of preparation and research.  As it came down to a decision by the court on who was more believable, it was essential that my client correctly told his story, and for me to highlight the inconsistencies in the other side’s version of the facts.

Conclusion 

This case highlights an essential lesson in entering into a contract (especially one involving real estate): put the deal in writing, and get the assistance of an attorney.  If the deal “goes bad”, as this one did, having a written agreement can spar you enormous time and money if a problem arises later on.   If you find yourself in a dispute over a real estate contract, contact me for a consultation.  Having an experienced attorney on your side is essential in a matter like this.

On a side note, one of the benefits of this case was having the opportunity to do a trial in the Newburyport branch of the Essex Superior Court.  This building, hands down, is the most beautiful courthouse in Massachusetts, and is setup in the style of a New England town meeting hall.  The picture above was taken by me with my drone, across the pond where the courthouse sits.