Understanding a Real Estate Purchase Agreement

A real estate purchase agreement is an essential part of buying or selling property.  Understanding the importance of these agreements is essential for avoiding potential problems later on in the sale process.

Selling Property Generally Requires A Written Agreement 

Massachusetts, like most states, has a statue of frauds, a law requiring that certain types of agreements be in writing to be enforceable, including the sale of property.  With few, limited exceptions, an oral agreement will not suffice when real estate is involved.

Importantly, the type of writing allowed for such agreements is broader than a traditional written contract.  A recent Land Court decision found that a binding agreement for the sale of property was created through text messages, and similar decisions have held that emails are also sufficient for satisfying the statute of frauds.

Common Types of Real Estate Purchase Agreements

For the sale of residential property, there are two common types of real estate purchase agreements: an offer to purchase real estate and a purchase and sale agreement.

An offer to purchase real estate is just that: a written offer for the sale of property.  These agreements are generally one or two pages and contain the “bare bones” terms of the sale.

When the parties are ready to move forward with the sale, a purchase and sale agreement is generally negotiated and signed.  This agreement contains more information on the sale of the property, which generally comes after the parties have had more time to seek financing and discuss the specific details of the sale.

The most important thing to remember about real estate purchase agreements is that such agreements are generally binding contracts.  If signed, a party is generally committed to selling or buying the property.  There can be defenses to such agreements, but a seller or buyer should exercise extreme care in signing one of these agreements.

Drafting Real Estate Purchase Agreements

If you are involved in buying or selling real estate, hire a lawyer to assist you in drafting a real estate purchase agreement.  An experienced attorney will know what to include in these agreements and how to include contingency clauses that excuse a party from performance if they are not able to buy or sell the property.

Enforcing or Defending a Real Estate Purchase Agreement 

If you need to enforce or defend a real estate purchase agreement, you need an experienced real estate litigation attorney on your side.  An attorney will help you in determining the right cause of action for your case and know the ways that the legal system can protect your interest in the property while the legal case is ongoing.

If you need help with one of these cases, contact me for a consultation.

Legal Tips for Buying Your First Home

Buying your first home can  be both an exciting and stressful experience.  While home ownership is, to many, the height of financial success, the process of purchasing a home has many traps for the unwary.

As a lawyer involved in real estate litigation, my cases generally come to me when things go wrong.  Here, I want to share some legal tips for buying your first home that can help avoid these pitfalls and make the experience as easy as possible.

Review Your Finances With a Financial Expert Prior to Purchasing a Home

A large portion of my practice consists of foreclosure defense.  While I have helped many, many homeowners save their homes from foreclosure, I always maintain that the best way to beat foreclosure is to avoid it in the first place.  With this in mind, a potential home buyer should always speak with a financial expert prior to making an offer on a home.  An expert can help you identify a home that meets your budget and offer advice for covering the many expenses that come with home ownership.  Buying your first home is an enormous financial investment, one that a financial expert can be a great help with.

Get Everything in Writing

Enforcing any oral promise is tough to do, for the simple reason that it is tough to prove one’s word against someone else’s.  In real estate, oral promises are even more problematic due to the statute of frauds, a legal requirement that most contracts for real estate be in writing.  Without such a writing, it can be difficult (and many times, impossible) to enforce an oral promise.  Make sure that all matters concerning the purchase of your  first home are in writing.

Give Careful Consideration to the Demands of Becoming a Landlord

When looking to purchase a home, many potential buyers are tempted to purchase homes that include a rental unit, to offset the expenses of home ownership.  Rental property can be an excellent investment, but you need to give careful consideration to the demands of becoming a landlord prior to purchasing such property.

Massachusetts has many, many requirements for landlords, and the penalties for not following these laws can be disastrous.  Moreover, as a landlord, you’ll be responsible for maintaining the property and addressing the problems that will come up over time.  Be prepared for these responsibilities before making this commitment.

Be Wary of Buying a Home With a Non-Married Partner

For a married couple, the process of addressing “who gets the home” during a divorce is difficult enough on its own.  For home owners who are not married, the process can be even more complicated.  If the non-married home owners split up, and are unable to agree on what to do with the home, a partition case may become necessary: a legal proceeding where the court determines who gets what, which can be long and expensive.

With this in mind, be careful about making the commitment of purchasing a home with someone who is not your “permanent” significant other.  If the relationship goes south, the process of dealing with the home can be a real hassle to resolve.

Hire a Lawyer for the Real Estate Closing

When closing on a home, hire a lawyer.  Buying your first home can be a complicated process, and having an experienced attorney on your side can make the process much easier.  It may be tempting to try and do this on your own, but resist this temptation!  A real estate attorney will review the necessary paperwork for your purchase and ensure that nothing is missing or incorrect.  The small fee for this legal service will go a long way in avoiding problems down the road.

Conclusion

Here’s hoping the purchase of your first home is a stress free and rewarding experience.  In the event that a legal problem does arise, contact me for a consultation.  The benefits of having an experienced attorney on your side can make all the difference in getting you the help you need.

How to Prevent Adverse Possession in Massachusetts

Adverse possession is an area of law that every Massachusetts property owner needs to be aware of.  These types of claim allows a party using another person’s property to acquire it through continuous use.  If you suspect your property may be used by someone else, it is important to know how to prevent adverse possession.

Overview of Adverse Possession

Adverse possession allows a party occupying another’s property to acquire it as their own.  Under such a claim, the continuous use of such property for twenty years allows a user to make it their own.  This doctrine of law has serious consequences for owners who neglect their property: under the right circumstances, a so-called “trespasser” can become a property owner.  

Know Your Property

Adverse possession commonly occurs in a scenario where property owners do not know “who owns what.”  Often, an adverse possession claim can arise when a property owner sincerely believes that the driveway, parking lot, or water access is their own, and uses it that way for the required twenty-year period.

For this reason, it is important to know your property, and learn your property boundaries through a formal land survey.  Doing so will allow a property owner to know if someone else is on their land.

Consider Giving the Non-Owner Permission to Use the Subject Property

A non-occupant’s use of property is not always contentious.  For example, a homeowner may learn that their neighbor’s shed encroaches several feet onto their property, on a portion of their backyard that is rarely used.  The homeowner may not care that the neighbor is using this land but, understandably, does not want to lose it from a potential adverse possession claim.  What can be done to prevent adverse possession?

In such a case, the homeowner may consider simply giving the non-occupant permission to use the property.  A central requirement of adverse possession is that the use must be non-permissive.  If the homeowner expressly gives permission to use the property, adverse possession cannot occur.

While this solution to adverse possession is fairly straightforward, it is still worth speaking to an attorney for advice on how to do this properly, so as to not lose the right to retain this property if it is ever needed again.

Court Action for Trespass or Injunctive Relief

If you are not able to resolve the matter amicably, court action may become necessary.  A party who feels someone else is using their property without permission can bring an action for trespass and seek injunctive relief, where a court formally orders a party to stay off a property.

Conclusion

If you find yourself in such a scenario, it is worth speaking to an attorney on how to prevent adverse possession.  I have helped other homeowners with similar claims and can provide the guidance necessary to resolve these tricky matters.

What is a Lis Pendens?

An effective tool in pursuing a real estate dispute is a lis pendens.  A request for a lis pendens often comes up in property lawsuits and can be useful for protecting one’s interest in real estate while a lawsuit is ongoing.

What is a Lis Pendens?

A lis pendens, simply put, is a formal notice of a pending legal action.  Per the law, a lis pendens is allowed for a lawsuit that “affects the title to real property or the use and occupation thereof or the buildings thereon . . .”  A lis pendens must be signed by a judge, after finding that the underlining lawsuit is one that meets this standard.  After a judge approves a lis pendens, it may be recorded in the appropriate registry of deeds as part of the land records.

Recording a lis pendens, on its own, will not stop the buying or selling of property.  The practical effect of a lis pendens, however, is to preserve the status quo while a lawsuit is ongoing.  Few people will buy real estate knowing that a lawsuit affecting the subject property remains ongoing.

Requirements for a Lis Pendens

Compared to a preliminary injunction (another legal tool for preserving the status quo during a lawsuit), a lis pendens is relatively easy to obtain.  The lawsuit must be one that affects title to real property, and must be verified by the party seeking the lis pendens.  This means that the party has affirmed, under the pains and penalties of perjury, that the facts of the lawsuit are correct.

Prior to recording a lis pendens, the law requires the party to prepare an affidavit stating that notice of the allowance of the lis pendens has been provided to the other parties in the lawsuit by certified mail.

In Superior Court, a lis pendens generally requires a hearing before the Court with proper notice to the other side.  While not in the formal rules for other trial courts in Massachusetts, this is the general practice for most lis pendens requests: the court will likely only consider this relief upon notice and hearing to the opposing party.

A party is permitted to seek a lis pendens on an emergency basis, by going to court first and not giving the opposing side notice (known as an”ex parte” action).  However, a party needs to show a real emergency for doing so.  If there is time for the court to hold a hearing and hear from the opposing side, the court will likely require a hearing.

Conclusion

A lis pendens is an effective part of litigating real estate disputes.  An experienced real estate litigation attorney can make a real difference in obtaining this relief and getting you the results you need.  If you find yourself in a dispute that may justify a lis pendens, contact me for a consultation.

Sherwin Law Firm Succeeds in Case of Easement by Prescription

I’m pleased to announce that I prevailed in a case last week involving an easement by prescription for residential property.  This case involved many interesting areas of Massachusetts property law.

Overview of the Case

My clients were homeowners who, for the past thirty years, had used a nearby paved lot by their home to park their cars.  Along with parking their cars, they regularly maintained the lot and performed improvements on the walls that surrounded the property.

Several years ago, someone else purchased this parking lot and demanded that my clients pay rent to use it.  My clients, who spent years using the lot as their own, were understandably upset about this turn of events and sought my legal advice on what could be done about this problem.

My Approach

I filed a lawsuit against the new owner of the property seeking a declaratory judgment that my clients were entitled to permanent use of the parking lot.  A declaratory judgment is a court order to determine one’s rights under the law.  A court order like this is needed in a case where the goal of the lawsuit is not money, but rather, a legal declaration from a court.

In this lawsuit, I asked for an easement by prescription for my clients.  An easement by prescription is a permanent right to use someone else’s land.  An easement by prescription requires the following:

  • The use of the property must be adverse for at least twenty years.  This  means that the person seeking an easement by prescription must show that the owner of the subject property never gave them permission to use the property.
  • The use of the property must constitute actual use.  This means that the person using the property used it in a way that property of that type is commonly used.
  • The use of the property must be open and notorious.  Simply put, the use of the property must put the actual owner on fair notice that someone else is using his or her property.

An easement by prescription is similar to adverse possession, which is a legal claim for permanent ownership of property that is used for twenty years.  The critical difference is that a claim of adverse possession requires a party to prove that their use of the property was exclusive, and  that the record owner of the property was “cut off” from the property.

An easement by prescription does not require proof of exclusive use.  Easements by prescription are commonly used for cases involving the right to use a road for access to land and for beach and waterfront rights (common in Cape Cod and other coastal areas of Massachusetts).

Outcome 

As with all claims of adverse possession and easements by prescription, the “devil is in the details.”  Proving one of these claims requires an understanding of how the subject property was used for the past twenty years, which often requires going through extensive land records, photographs, and other evidence related to the property’s use.  A trial for one of these cases requires that this evidence be presented to the Court in a way that coherently explains the required elements above.

In the end, the work on this case was worth it: following a trial, the Court agreed with our claim, and granted my clients a permanent easement for parking.

Lessons for Property Owners In Similar Cases 

Claims for adverse possession and easement by prescription may, at first blush, appear to be trivial, with neighbors fighting over small parcels of property.   In actuality, these disputes concern incredibly important matters.  Here, parking access was essential to my clients, who lived in a city that had limited off-street parking, making this easement by prescription a huge benefit to my clients’ home.

If you find yourself in a dispute involving the use of property, contact me for a consultation.  A lesson of this case is that long standing use of property, under the right conditions, can allow for a permanent right to access or ownership .  An experienced real estate attorney can help you decide if one of these claims is worth pursuing.

5B Affidavits

Massachusetts has an important law allowing for the clarification of potential issues in the ownership of property.  G.L. 183, § 5B provides for the following:

Subject to section 15 of chapter 184, an affidavit made by a person claiming to have personal knowledge of the facts therein stated and containing a certificate by an attorney at law that the facts stated in the affidavit are relevant to the title to certain land and will be of benefit and assistance in clarifying the chain of title may be filed for record and shall be recorded in the registry of deeds where the land or any part thereof lies.

Commonly known as “5B Affidavits”, these affidavits allow for the recording of information relevant to real property.  5B affidavits can be used to correct problems arising with Massachusetts real estate, such as potential problems involving the conveyance of property.  I have found 5B affidavits to be useful for foreclosure related matters; a foreclosure by entry, which is a foreclosure that begins with the recording of a certificate in the land records, requires a homeowner to oppose this foreclosure within three years of this certificate’s filing in the land records.  A 5B affidavit can be used as a means of preventing this type of foreclosure from occurring.

5B affidavits, importantly, must be certified by an attorney.  The law does not allow a non-attorney to record one of these affidavits on their own.

While 5B affidavits are commonly used for real estate matters, there is surprisingly little caselaw on the limits to how these affidavits can be used.  Although the law is written broadly, for use in “clarifying the chain of title” for real estate, I take the position that an attorney should exercise caution in recording such an affidavit.  A 5B affidavit should have a good faith basis in law and fact, and have a real purpose for the respective property it pertains to.  An affidavit that does not meet this standard can potentially subject a property owner (and attorney) to potential liability.

If you find yourself in a real estate dispute, contact me for a consultation.

Boundary Line Disputes

Boundary Line Disputes

Boundary line disputes are, arguably, one of the most contentious areas of law.   Understanding the right approach to dealing with boundary line disputes can make a real difference in effectively resolving these problems.

Determine Your Property Boundaries

The first step in resolving boundary line disputes is to determine your property boundaries.  Many times, the boundary line for property is not where the owner believes it is.  Even though fences and other physical structures may, informally, be considered the perimeters of property, the actual property lines may be in a different location.  Determining property boundaries is generally done by a survey or plot plan, which is prepared by a licensed surveyor.  A surveyor will review the land records for the subject property (found in the appropriate registry of deeds) and state the exact location of the property’s boundaries.

A survey or plot plan, however, is not always the final authority for determining a land boundaries.  Massachusetts, like most other states, allows for adverse possession of real property.  Adverse possession is a legal claim where the continuous use of property by a non-owner allows that user to legally acquire the property.  As such, even if the survey or plot plan states that disputed property belongs to a particular person, an adverse possession claim may allow a non-owner to become the property’s record owner.

Attempt to Resolve the Matter Amicably 

Property owners should always attempt to resolve boundary line disputes without going to court.  Court cases, while sometimes necessary, can be long and expensive.  Many times, boundary line disputes can be worked out amicably, which is to everyone’s benefit.  Mediation, where the parties meet with a neutral party to discuss the dispute, can be a useful process for these matters.

Although it is beneficial to try and settle these matters out of court, it is still a good idea to speak with an attorney for help with these negotiations.  A lawyer can help advise you of your rights and determine the best way to proceed.

Seek Court Action If A Resolution Cannot Be Found

For boundary line disputes that cannot be resolved amicably, court action may be necessary.  Massachusetts law allows property owners to get a court declaration on the ownership of property, and a court order preventing a party from using a portion of property, if necessary.

Unlike many states, Massachusetts has a court that specializes in property cases: Land Court.  Land Court is a popular court for these types of cases, with judges and staff that are familiar with these matters.  In addition to Land Court, these cases can also be brought in Superior Court or federal court.

If you find yourself in need of a court case for a boundary line dispute, contact a lawyer for assistance.  Preparing and filing a lawsuit for boundary line disputes can be tricky, and having an experienced attorney on your side can make all the difference in getting the results you need.